Description

Published date: 12 December 2011

What was life like for the ‘average’ black person in England before the 20th century? Most were quietly getting on with their lives, seeking employment, getting married and raising families. It takes a lot of work to uncover their life histories because there was no legal discrimination against these individuals. Glimpses into their lives can be found buried in The National Archives’ vast collection, which reveals unexpected stories. Dr Chater’s talk challenges some commonly held assumptions that have been made about the lives of black Britons during the period of the British slave trade. Dr Kathleen Chater is an independent historian and writer. Her doctoral thesis is published as Untold Histories: Black people in England and Wales during the period of the British slave trade, c. 1660-1807. She came to the history of Black British people through genealogy and has written books and articles on this subject. This talk was part of our diversity week event in November, highlighting the diversity of The National Archives’ collection.

Author: Dr Kathleen Chater Duration: 44:00

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)
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  1. 5 April 2012
    5:25 pm

    Miranda Kaufmann

    Just found this- brilliant to have this online! Thanks Kathy for all your research- 5000 entries! and thanks to The National Archives for hosting her!

  2. 23 September 2012
    8:01 pm

    Michael Ohajuru

    5,000 untold histories made real and relevant to day’s reality, Blacks didn’t arrive in 1955 they have a history which Kathy reveals along with how the majority of us white and and black have servants in our ancestry. Excellent!

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